Becoming fit

I did some research and found articles where researchers report better outcomes for people that work out and those who have higher levels of vitamin D. My gastro already put me on vitamin D. A pill a day. I asked for iron and he let me take it, so I am on iron too, building the hemoglobin level that the evil and treacherous colon dropped along those years. I already saw improvements after the colectomy, and I wasn’t taking extra iron yet. Now, I am pretty curious about my next blood test. Be careful nurses, your needles will bend and break! Please keep your magnets away from me! I think I will be pretty close to normal levels already!

I am curious about those studies dealing with vitamin D. What did they mean? Did they mean that bringing up levels of vitamin D is directly related to a better outcome? Or did they mean that those patients that had higher levels before treatment had a better chance to become healthy? I believe it was the second case, but I take my pills every day, because I think our researchers have not fully studied the situation. It may just be that I don’t know.

As for workouts, I believe that being fit is always a benefit (and it sounds pretty cool being phrased like this!) running or jogging improve the way lungs perform, and being in hospitals, better oxygen use is always an advantage when the body is having a difficult time. It is my belief, because I haven’t proved it, that recovery is a lot better the fitter we are.

After surgery I started walking in the hospital and after I went home, I started working out every Sunday. I first went walking and I did 2 km, stopping in the middle to rest and drink water. Next week I walked the same without stopping. I kept asking my surgeon if I could run, and the last time he allowed me to jog.
I started going to a local trail/track. It’s not a track because it’s hilly and irregular, and it’s not a trail because it was built. It’s full of people because it’s the city, and in this poor country facilities are not awesome, but I live very close to the spot and I don’t want to sink in the traffic to go somewhere else.
I have been slowly building distance and speed (from snail to turtle is how I would best describe my improvements, just in case you wanted to be impressed and become a fan!), and my last run this past Sunday was 5 km in 38 minutes on the hilly course, and I did take a bigger hill during the last lap.
I used to run very often when I was in the sprint kayaking team in my late teens. I used to think anybody should be able to run 5 km any day of their life, and we used to tease a girl that ran the 5 km in 35 minutes. These days I have found out that 5 km can be beyond my possibilities and that those slow runs, while my goal is to improve them, are making me very proud.
I run with a bottle of electrolytes that I don’t touch until I finish my run, my iPhone recording time, distance and elevation (logging the data is very important!), my car key tucked in a small pocket and my big awestomy bag, hopefully pretty much empty. Sometimes the awestomy behaves, sometimes it’s in a bad mood. Last Sunday my belly was disturbed, let’s say. It didn’t feel nice, it wasn’t in pain. Disturbed is the right term. But it’s nothing to worry about. It’s just the way it is sometimes. I really believe I will start treatment next week, so this weekend is my last weekend running “normal”. I will soon start radiation and chemotherapy. I am pretty sure I will become a superhero. Everybody knows they get their super powers while subjected to extreme conditions and radiation plus toxic chemicals make a very promising mixture for the transformation.
My plan is to keep working out through chemo, even if it’s only walking, I will do what I can. The body must be as strong as possible to improve my recovery.

I wrote this a few weeks ago, before a blocked intestine landed me in the ER for a painful and boring weekend. It’s been two weeks since I left the hospital. I have gone running twice. Last week I ran only 3 km, which is about two miles for those that speak miles. I felt a bit weird, and in normal health I would have pushed my run to complete 5 km, but having an ileostomy and being somewhat prone to dehydration, I preferred to be cautious and stop. I didn’t like stopping. I came back in a terrible mood that was worsened by a rain that went from a few drops to a huge shower in the three minutes it took me to park the car. I had my big Colombian umbrella and I didn’t get wet, but still, I didn’t like it that it rained on me as if it was a fun prank or whatever. Silly weather.
The rest of the week has been sunny and I have been very happy. I wouldn’t be able to live in places like Wisconsin or Pennsylvania, for example. Maine is beautiful, but I only know summer there. Even Bogotá is too cold for me. Sunny days have made me happy this week.

Today I went running. It’s a hilly course. Like a half mile track on the side of a hill. Going uphill I felt pain in my abdomen, on the right side, close to my ileostomy. I stopped after two laps, rested it out, and continued. Felt the pain again and decided to stop. The lungs were doing fine and my skinny legs were also good, but that pain didn’t let me continue and I again preferred to stop. Hopefully it was only something meaningless like swallowed air.

I promise I will do better next week. I may go to a level course in the university. I want to run the five km in less than 25 minutes. I want to be able to run 2 km in eight minutes even if my tongue ends up tangling in my feet. Those things used to make me feel good about half my life ago. For now, improving my distance and time are good ways to become healthy and in better shape to recover from whatever may come. Do you have cancer? Run with me! You don’t have cancer? Run with me! It’s good for our bodies.

My failed run today finished with a smile. An old man passed me twice on the track. I was happy to see him doing better than this 37 year old!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s